HireMyVA Podcast

HireMyVA Podcast 137- Why is it important for team members to know their roles on a team?

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Episode Summary

Never underestimate the value of defining roles and duties in the workplace, even if it is tough at times. Many individuals wear many hats, performing tasks that are outside the scope of their primary job description. Unfortunately, this can cause a lot of uncertainty within the organization, especially if leadership roles aren't given appropriately. Clearly outlining roles and expectations can benefit the entire organization, especially when it comes to collaborative initiatives.

When people understand their jobs, they work better together. When everyone understands their role as a member of the group, there is less clamoring for status, fewer conflicts, more overall productivity and far less energy wasted.

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Episode Transcription

Dave Braun
00:00:03
Hey, everyone. Welcome to the HireMyVA Team and Business Building Podcast brought to you by Yoogozi.com. In this podcast and at HireMyVA, we help you to reclaim your freedom through hiring and thriving with Virtual Assistants without breaking the bank. And I said that all in one breath, how’s that? Hey, I’m Dave Braun and as usual, I’m here with Larry Broughton, my fantastic friend, and mentor, buddy, traveling through life with me. Larry, I know you’ve coached thousands of entrepreneurs to become successful, not only in their businesses but in their lives. We just had a great Q & A call yesterday. Every time we’re on those things, I Marvel at the wisdom that comes out of your brain. And then now thank you for that. It’s pretty awesome.

Larry Broughton
00:00:47
Well, thank you, David. Hi, handsome David, how are you? Hey, listen, sometimes you just gotta—this is I think a lesson for everybody, right? When you get to the advanced age that you and I are at and if are committed to being lifelong learners—you and I are avid readers, right?

Dave Braun
00:01:07
Yeah.

Larry Broughton
00:01:08
And a few years ago when we did this top 101 books, which by the way, folks stay tuned while we’re redoing this, adding some new books.

Larry Broughton
00:01:19
If you look at the number of books that we’ve read, the number of conversations that we’ve had, the number of podcasts that we listen to, and radio shows, and seminars that we go to, if you actually take just one nugget from each of those interactions, you apply those to your life and you stare at your Naval a little bit to understand how bad experiences and good experiences have impacted us. And then you just share those with the world, that’s called wisdom. And sometimes I just recognize, I just need to open myself up when people are sharing their challenges and just let the universe flow. Because something, I am shocked, you’ve seen to look on my face, sometimes at masterminds. It was like, where the hell did that come from?

Dave Braun
00:02:10
That’s absolutely true.

Larry Broughton
00:02:12
I can remember a couple of those situations. Like we’re all an odd because I realize sometimes I’m just the vessel, you know?

Dave Braun
00:02:18
Yeah, we all are. But it’s us being willing to be the vessel and to be open and you know, like you said, reading books, listening to podcasts, expanding ourselves, having different experiences. And we learn from other people as well.

Larry Broughton
00:02:34
Well, here’s the lesson I think in here. And this is where I think I’m—and I do get that I am a little gifted in this area, is that my ego doesn’t get in the way. I don’t care whether I get credit for the idea or not. I’m in enough meetings, I’ve been doing life long enough to be in a meeting with someone and see that rather than trying to contribute to the conversation or to flush out new ideas. They’re formulating what their next response is going to be. Do you know what I mean? So, of just being in the moment and trying to serve the people that are in the meeting with you. They’re concerned about how am I gonna look, you know, how am I going to—how there’s gamesmanship that goes on with some people. And I think that we could all learn from this and it came up just in the—I think it was a Q & A yesterday.

Larry Broughton
00:03:25
Sometimes it’s just about perspective. We can look at rent, for instance, I think that was the topic. Somebody’s paying rent and they’re like, oh, such a waste for me to be paying this rent and a drive of nuts every time they write that check. Well, you could look at it that way or you could look at it that, listen, I feel blessed that I have the money to pay for this rent right now and to live in this spectacular home that I couldn’t afford, but I’m allowed to be here, in this home, allows me to have this great office. And except the blessings, instead of like having me your ego attached to it. I know that that’s airy-fairy for a lot of people. I know it’s a little crunchy girl and all of the California stuff. But I’m just trying to share that I’m dedicated to lifelong learning. I’m not who I used to be. And I’m just trying to share the good stuff that I’ve learned along the way. I just don’t want people to have to navigate the roadblocks and minefields that you and I had had to navigate over the years. That’s it.

Dave Braun
00:04:26
That’s great advice. And you said you’re not the same person and neither am I. If you think back Larry, 5 years or even 10 years at who you were then, and you think about who you are now, what you’ve learned, where you’ve gone to, or when, where you’ve come from. If you are on a lifelong learning path, you should almost be proud of yourself.

Larry Broughton
00:04:48
Yes.

Dave Braun
00:04:48
And if you’re not, well, then you need to change it.

Larry Broughton
00:04:54
You know, I was on a coaching call this morning with someone that you know, and I remember, I think you were there the first time that we met her at a conference and she had this armor up and she was shy and she was nervous to talk. And the next thing you know, today, she’s freaking on fire and doing research and knows numbers and is doing a real, legitimate, competitive set analysis on her business compared to other businesses. Like, oh, who are you, what’s happened here? Well, you know what? She has surrounded herself with people who are bolder and brighter than she was back then. She had the courage to step into an environment where she was gonna be a little bit uncomfortable at first and humbled herself, served when she could, took the fuel from others when they gave it to her and went out on the edge. It takes guts. It takes courage to do that.

Dave Braun
00:06:01
It takes courage to humble yourself because when you put yourself in that position, you become vulnerable.

Larry Broughton
00:06:06
Yeah. For sure.

Dave Braun
00:06:07
That’s scary.

Larry Broughton
00:06:08
For sure. Yeah. Well, it’s funny that we’re talking about this already because I think you gave me a glimpse of what we’re gonna be talking about today. And this ties into this a little bit in a tangent—in a weird way but why don’t you go ahead and let—What are we talking about today, Dave?

Dave Braun
00:06:25
Okay, well, this is episode 137 of our podcast. And the question today is, why is it important for team members to know their roles on a team?

Larry Broughton
00:06:37
So yeah, I remember when you read that to me, whatever, it was 10 minutes ago, I think we both laughed. It’s like—

Dave Braun
00:06:44
Yeah.

Larry Broughton
00:06:45
Well, these are the questions we get, my friends. Not to poke holes at the person who gave us the question, but I do get it. The reason I was laughing is because, listen, we’ve done enough consulting with the organizations where we’ve gone in and met with team members or employees. And when you get them behind closed doors, away from their managers, business owners, and leaders, and you say, so what’s your role here? Where do you fit in the organization? They don’t really know. They know what some of their tasks might be. They know what some of their duties might be, but they don’t know what the impact that they’re truly having on the organization and what benefit they are bringing to the organization. How sad is that? Someone who spends about a third of their life in business, in your environment and they don’t have a purpose or they don’t know what their purpose is there.

Larry Broughton
00:07:44
That’s a little bit heartbreaking for me. And so you wonder why people get burned out? You wonder, why do people get resentful of their bosses? You wonder why do people quit without notice? This is really what’s happening. And there’s an amazing statistic that I share all the time. So folks bear with me if you are a follower of ours, but it’s worth repeating. And that is the state of the American workforce survey done by the Gallup organization each year. And preliminary, is that how you say it? Whatever.

Dave Braun
00:08:15
Annually? Whatever.

Larry Broughton
00:08:16
Annually. Each year, it comes up that roughly 67% of the American workforce is either disengaged or actively disengaged in your organization, 67%. And when you peel back the onion, you peel back the layers and you look at where, why are people so disengaged, most of those people feel like they’re not being professionally developed.

Dave Braun
00:08:41
Right?

Larry Broughton
00:08:43
So why would you professionally develop someone? So that they have a path, they have a career path, and they know where they’re going. Instead, Dave, what we have found when we’ve gone into a lot of these organizations is that people realize, okay, I need to have a warm body standing in the front of this cash register at this time. And so they hire that warm body. And that’s the last training they ever got. But what this is reminiscent of for me when I think about the most high-performing teams I’ve ever been on, the most high performing teams, whether it’s sports or business or my military career, it’s by far being on special forces A teams in the green berets, there are 12 guys on special forces A team, and all type A personalities, all above average intelligence, pretty high IQs as a matter of fact, hard chargers, all pursuing excellence in everything that they do.

Larry Broughton
00:09:44
Now, if you put 12 people like that into a boardroom, what do you normally get? Exactly. Pandemonium, jocking for power, people backstabbing each other, somebody trying to become the alpha, who’s the alpha here. Who’s gonna be the apex predator. Well, because I’m at special forces A teams, everyone knows what their role is and they know what impact and benefit— this is the key, the benefit that they’re having on the mission, people are willing to support each other else. People are willing to say, Hey, I’ll subordinate my apex predator tendencies for the results of the mission or our agenda, because we all are gonna finish versus, if you think about, I’m sorry, I’m kind of in this air in my life where I’m looking—I’m studying lots of anthropology and human behavior and how do chimpanzees react in the wild and baboons and that kind of thing.

Larry Broughton
01:10:54
Exactly. So what happens when you have a Silverback gorilla or you’ve got an alpha male chimpanzee? It only takes— if you’ve got one chimpanzee or one Silverback gorilla who only rules through tyranny and power, it only takes three younger, less strong apes or chimpanzees. You’re gonna tear that leader apart, limb from limb. And so you can’t be the type of leader that comes and says do this because I say so. You’ve gotta really build a team. So you can have a bunch of alphas. You know, this is why you and I preach all the time, surround yourself with people who are bolder and brighter than you are. This should be no problem with having people on your team who are smarter at their roles than you are. Because if they all know what their mission is on the team, they’re gonna help everybody else out on the team.

Larry Broughton
01:11:54
And if you and I, let’s say that we are the alpha dog in the room, and if we don’t really care about whether we’re getting the credit or not, as long as the team gets the credit, there’s no threat of an overthrow or that the younger champs are gonna come in and tear our arms off and eat us literally. So on special forces A teams, we actually do— well, in the military, just to get into the military, you do, you take the ASVAB Assessment, Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, to find out what is your basic aptitude. What are your strengths? And then you get people to work inside your strengths. So why is it important to understand the role that they play on the team? I’m sorry, I’m kind of doing a homily here. I’ll let you speak here in a second.

Larry Broughton
01:12:40
It’s because when people know what their mission is, they’ll show up much more inspired. They’re gonna come into work like they get to come in, they get to contribute. And if you have an environment where ideas are accepted, failing is also accepted because, without failure, you don’t get change, you don’t get innovation, and you don’t get creativity. And so when you build that type of environment and people know what their role is, they’re more likely to help other people on the team. And everybody wants to be in a working environment where they’re working in their strengths, they’re getting support from their team members, they’re making an impact on the organization, therefore, making an impact on the world and their community. That’s just a great environment. But sadly, most people don’t have that, Dave. They literally go in and they punch a clock and they don’t really know.

Larry Broughton
01:13:32
You know, I feel like my dad was this way and rest his soul. You know, he was a machine operator in this plant and all he did all day is pull a piece of metal through a thing, two hands to hit a button, a press comes down, slides the thing out. And that’s all he did all day like, oh my gosh, monotony. And I don’t even know that he knew what that piece that that machine was making, did in the bigger machine that was being built. And so not that those roles aren’t important as well, but my sense is the people that are listening to this podcast aren’t that. So I think it’s very important that people know what their mission is because they’re gonna feel more inspired. If your team members feel more inspired, that means productivity is gonna skyrocket.

Larry Broughton
01:14:22
I forget the percentage. We did a deep dive several years ago with my former business partner on this, how much productivity increased when people were working inside their strengths but it’s phenomenal. So when productivity goes up and turnover goes down, which happens, those are the two things that really drive profitability in your organization. What would happen to your organization, Dave, if all of a sudden your turnover went from— pick a number— for people, you know, in today’s environment, it’s a 100% or 90%. What if you could cut that in half? Cut it by two-thirds?

Dave Braun
01:15:00
Yeah. It’s huge.

Larry Broughton
01:15:01
How much profitability would that be? What if every person on your team wanted to be there and productivity and morale went up? So expenses go down, productivity goes up, that’s a combination for success right there, right?

Dave Braun
01:15:17
Yeah. So I think one of the things that people may be asking themselves right now, we talked about the roles and people need to know what they are and most people don’t and the unengaged and all that. So how do we know if our team members know what role they’re supposed to play? Have a conversation, hopefully, you guys are doing—I don’t know, how do you call it, touching tables. But that’s how you talk about it in the hospitality industry but have a conversation—

Larry Broughton
01:15:49
Corners or touching tables. Yeah.

Dave Braun
01:15:51
Yeah. So have a conversation with somebody the next time, this next week, have a good conversation with all of your team members on an individual basis. So, you know, by the way, Joe, you know, I wanna know… it’s really important for me to know that you know your roles and responsibilities within the organization, I wanna make sure that you’re fulfilling your fullest potential in the organization. What do you think your role is? Are you happy in that role?

Larry Broughton
01:16:22
Yeah. I love that idea. I really do. And I want people to do that. I’m gonna set this up though, for folks because I can imagine—

Dave Braun
01:16:30

Larry Broughton
01:16:31
No, it’s just that, I think that I can see where there—if you just out of the blue, this is the first time you’ve ever had a conversation like this with somebody, you’re probably not gonna get a real answer from them because they’re like, they’re gonna ask, what answer do you want me to give you a boss?

Dave Braun
01:16:47
Yeah, that’s true.

Larry Broughton
01:16:48
But I think you can start it just like this. Hey, you know, I was listening to a podcast the other day and the topic of team members understanding what their role in the organization is. And it really got me thinking, that the team members around here know what their role is in the organization. And even more importantly, do they know the impact that they’re making in the organization? What do you think about that? Start with that because that’s an open-ended question. And then say, okay, Joe, do you know the impact? Like, if I am falling short, how would you feel if you really understood the impact you’re making? How can I communicate more effectively to you?

Dave Braun
01:17:36
Yeah.

Larry Broughton
01:17:36
So you understand what your role is. Do you understand what your role is? Do you know what I mean? Instead of like just ripping the bandit off and say, Hey Dave, do you know what your role is in the organization?

Dave Braun
01:17:47
Yeah.

Larry Broughton
01:17:47
Like a deer in the headlights. Where is this coming from, man? My point is there’s some nuance when it comes to languaging. You have to take people on the journey a little bit. And if you’re the type of leader or manager who’s never done this before, it’s gonna be very difficult for you, and frankly, the people in your organization may be a little bit weirded out and might not give you honest answers in the beginning. They may tap dance or whatever. So use this as an opportunity, Dave, I think to start a dialogue. I don’t know an industry that’s not been impacted by the great resignation or the big quit or whatever it is that we’re calling it. And you kinda come up with a different name because it’s not the big quit or the great resignation anymore, it’s the, can’t get people to come into work or can’t get people to show up for interviews kind of thing.

Larry Broughton
01:18:42
There’s a staffing shortage across the country. I’m talking about industries. I do know individual businesses that are thriving and they’re fully staffed. And they got people wanting to work there because they’ve got good cultures and people don’t wanna leave because they have a fully engaged workforce. But you’ve gotta get intentional about this. So I always apply, not always. Well, you know, both of us, we apply our past experiences to a current problem. My past experiences is military and entrepreneurship. You’ve got a sports and corporate America background. What twist would you put on this, Dave, from your background, about how important is it that team members understand their role in your organization?

Dave Braun
01:19:32
Well, I will give you that twist in a minute. But I don’t wanna let this go because I’m thinking practically for somebody. So maybe they have three or four, five or ten team members. I’m thinking, you know, okay Larry, I like that, I like what you said about listening to a podcast yesterday, do the team members know, what do you think about that when you’re talking to somebody. Would you recommend talking to—I mean, how would you start? You got 5 or 10 team members. You gotta pick somebody to start with. Would you pick, say somebody who’s been with you for a while? Who’s you got a really good relationship with and see how that goes or would you pick the new person?

Larry Broughton
02:20:14
I pick the safe one first, just to get your languaging down because you’ll realize there will be some words that will trigger people to become defensive. But here’s what I end up finding with people. They avoid asking the people that they know will be the harshest critic or they put them last.

Dave Braun
02:20:36
Ah, okay.

Larry Broughton
02:20:38
I would name the elephant in the room after going to like the two people that are safe and I get my languaging down and I hear some of the benefits that they’re having. I would go to maybe the third interview would be the person who’s like the harshest critic and say, Dave, I know, man, you know, I’ve been here long enough, you’ve been here long enough. I was listening to this podcast the other day and go through the script that I kind of said it a second ago. And it really got me thinking. And so, knowing some of the— that you had some great ideas and even some challenges with the way things have gone around here in the past and you’ve had some legitimate frustrations. What do you think about this? Because it’s really important for me to get your feedback as well.

Dave Braun
02:21:23
Okay.

Larry Broughton
02:21:24
I bet you would shock them if you went with an open heart and really went to listen to them because people like this who are constant critics are used to being ostracized. They’re used to being pushed to the periphery. They’re used to people rolling their eyes at them. And this is one of the reasons they get defensive. This is one of the reasons why they become sharpshooters. Because it’s the only attention that they’re gonna get. I dunno if that’s right, but I mean, that’s what I’ve experienced in my life. So the sharpshooters, the people who are the harshest critics, I wouldn’t put them to the end because the word is gonna get out. Hey, you know, Larry’s walking around and asking me really weird questions today. And that person is gonna be thinking, oh, either goody, goody or like, oh they’re never gonna come talk to me. Be kind of, catch him off guard a little bit.

Dave Braun
02:22:21
Yeah. Okay. That’s right.

Larry Broughton
02:22:23
That’s my thought. I may be wrong. Everything I say may be wrong. I’d like to hear what other people think about this. So if you’ve got ideas, if you’ve tried this in the past, or if a suggestion on how I might do this better or one of our other fellow tribes, people might do it better. I’d love to hear your comments.

Dave Braun
02:22:43
Okay. So I got one more twist for you. Are you ready?

Larry Broughton
02:22:45
Do the twist and then I wanna hear your—

Dave Braun
02:22:47

Larry Broughton
02:22:48
Your thing on sports corporate America. Go ahead.

Dave Braun
02:22:50
Not the Chuck Berry twist or whatever it was. So would you, at some point—because this is what came to my mind is, would do at some point ask maybe one of your most trusted folks on your team, what do you think my role should be in the organization?

Larry Broughton
02:23:08
Yeah. I think he should always be asking that. We do this as part of our confidential work climate surveys, right?

Dave Braun
02:23:20
Yeah.

Larry Broughton
02:23:22
And when we’ve asked it, oftentimes people say, we want you to be the inspirational leader. We want you to be focused on strategy stuff. But what I’ve learned over the years, is generally, people want to feel like the business owner or the leader, the manager is there supporting them, giving them the tools and resources to be better at their job.

Dave Braun
02:23:47
Yeah. You know—

Larry Broughton
02:23:48
And developing them professionally.

Dave Braun
02:23:49
So if we come back to you asking me about corporate America and sports and stuff. As an employee in corporate America for almost 30 years, the first things that came to my mind is if my boss asked me that, I would say, I’d really like for you to stop by the lab where we’re doing our work and say hi every now and then, and ask a few questions about what we’re doing and ask what kind of issues we’ve got and maybe how we can improve what we are doing or what tools that we need. That would be one of the answers.

Larry Broughton
02:24:29
I think that’s a really good one, Dave. I mean, obviously, let’s not forget the basics. The basic is if you’ve got a business, you should have position profiles or some people call them job descriptions. You should have that. So these are the basics, here are the basics you gotta do. But the key is that you’re kind of getting to what’s the impact that the effort there at the lab is having on the overall organization. These are morale issues that you can’t see—

Dave Braun
02:24:58
That’s right.

Larry Broughton
02:24:59
You must have—what do they say? The beatings will continue until morale approves.

Dave Braun
02:25:08
And I think that’s a really good point about these are morale issues because asking these types of questions are going to hopefully improve morale or point out where it, maybe some of the changes that you can make to improve morale would be. So I think that’s important.

Larry Broughton
02:25:30
Yeah. I like that idea though. And I was having a conversation with someone last night about this that given the size of our organization now because we’re not as large as we used to be. And so I’m playing a more active role kind of, not just strategic but tactical. Three years ago I was rarely going to a team, meeting our staff, meeting, whatever you wanna call, it at our hotels. And so last Monday I was there running a team meeting at one of our hotels. And it gives me an opportunity again to be talking to room attendants and talking to our guest service host one on one. And so the woman I was talking about said, well, I was talking to her like out of frustration, like, oh my gosh, is this really the highest and best use of my time. And she was kinda like a mirror and said, well, no, not long term, but right now you’re re-engaging with people. You’re the one who keeps saying that the work climate is different today than it was five years from now. Now you are really gonna have your finger on the pulse of the organization. So you’re talking about where your boss would actually walk into the lab and spoke into the engineers.

Dave Braun
02:26:40
Yeah.

Larry Broughton
02:26:41
What insight would that have offered?

Dave Braun
02:26:43
Oh yeah.

Larry Broughton
02:26:44
Right.

Dave Braun
02:26:45
And if I think back to that time, because sometimes the bosses, they never came in. It almost made me feel me feel like they were—it never made me feel like they were too important to come in and made me feel like they were afraid to come in.

Larry Broughton
02:27:01
Well, that’s probably true.

Dave Braun
02:27:02
And afraid to like, see what was really going on, and to hear very smart people, give them some feedback.

Larry Broughton
02:27:10
Well, look, it takes courage. It takes guts to hire people that are smarter, bold and brighter than you are.

Dave Braun
02:27:17
Yeah, it does.

Larry Broughton
02:27:18
But what you need to do is have a level of confidence about your own competence. Competence comes from, you know, we’ve talked about this, right? Once your competence is at a high level, you have more confidence. But the key is understanding what is your competence? Because your competence is gonna be my competence. I couldn’t walk in and go head to head with you in some engineering lab because that’s your expertise. My expertise is something completely different that might not be your expertise. So I understand, I’m good at putting teams together. I’m good at strategic, I’m good at strategery, Dave. And there are other things that I’m good at, but if it comes down to engineering, that’s not my thing.

Dave Braun
02:28:10
Yeah. So whenever we’re gonna do that as a leader, we talk about vulnerability, humbleness, that’s definitely gonna happen. Also, then I guess my last point would be—you know, we talk about sports, I enjoy football and the Rams won the super bowl as I have watched that season and I’ve watched some of the games over and over and thinking about how it all worked. There were times when everybody on—And the reason I talk about sports is because, I mean, you see the score, right? There’s statistics. It’s so easy to know if you’re performing well or not. And you know an offense as a quarterback, a running back, defenses got linebackers, defensive backs, and defensive linemen. And you know, you think about the roles and responsibilities of each one are pretty clearly defined.

Dave Braun
02:29:06
But if they weren’t defined or if somebody goes outside of that role and the rest of the team members are not informed, they can be disaster. So in other words, say a cornerback, normally they’re gonna cover the outside receiver, but sometimes they blitz to put pressure on the quarterback. Well, if they blitz and the rest of the defensive secondary doesn’t know that there is an open receiver going down the field and it’s a disaster for the defense. So if you have some team members that are going potentially outside of their roles, which can be great, you want that to happen on occasion, but there’s gotta be communication to everybody else to say, Hey, I’m stepping in this role for a particular reason. It could be, Hey, you’ve got this big amount of business coming in or a new opportunity. Everybody’s gotta pull together to go into a different role temporarily. That’s cool, as long as you communicate about them.

Larry Broughton
03:30:06
Yeah. So you’ve mentioned communication. We’re looking at a hotel acquisition right now and it just so happens. Anthony Mill Curry if you are watching this because I know you do from time to time. It’s a hotel that was on hotel impossible several years ago. And I think some folks know that I was a guest expert on this show a few times with my friend Anthony Mill Curry, who was the host. And so, because I was know that we’re kinda looking at his hotel, I went back and watched that episode from several years ago and so if you don’t know the premise of the show, Anthony Mill Curry hotelier would go into a failing, struggling property and renovate part of the hotel and come up with a new operating plan to turn the hotel around. You know what we always say in business, there is really only so many areas of problems, people, product process, and profit problems in business.

Larry Broughton
03:31:08
Invariably, it’s always a people problem, a product problem, a process problem, or a profit problem. It’s probably really a people problem. And so as Anthony is walking through this hotel where there was a new ownership group and a new manager, and he’s talking to some of the team members who’ve been there for a while and say, I’ve got the new manager here, what would you like to hear? Or if you were in his shoes, what would you be doing differently? I would communicate more. I would talk to the team more. I would let them know what we’re doing, what you’re doing more often. Because we’re in the dark. And we just hear things through the grapevine kind of thing. Your key about communication is absolutely, particularly on the football field where things are happening in real-time. And this is why like morning standups are important. This is why memos are important. This is why video chats are important. This is why quarterly state of the company businesses. I mean, quarterly state of the company reports and video chats or whatever is so important. Because in those, every time you do that, there’s an opportunity to reinforce what people’s role is in the organization.

Dave Braun
03:32:21
Yes.

Larry Broughton
03:32:21
And it’s not just about pontificating and telling flower stories, although it’s part of it, for sure. But it’s to recognize— you don’t need to go through every team member on the team and say your role is this, but it might be an opportunity. Okay, this time I’m gonna talk about, Dave, thanks so much for playing this role, you did a great job and then reinforcing that publicly and get specific about what you’re doing great. And think, oh, that’s what Dave’s role is. Oh, that’s a really good reminder. And then the next time you can call out another team member. Just an idea.

Dave Braun
03:32:58
Yeah. And that’s why it’s important to— you know, depending upon the type of person you are, that’s why it’s important to have scheduled regular meetings and give yourself opportunity for these things to happen. Sometimes you just gotta force it with your calendar, sometimes you have to. All right. Well, I don’t know how we did it, but how long was that? It’s been like 35 minutes or whatever. Talking about a simple question of why is it important for team members to know their roles on a team? That was awesome. I thought I was a blast. I learned a lot. I learned a lot. That was good. Okay. So we are gonna wrap this up. Thank you folks for joining us today. And remember building a team is the way to reclaim your freedom.

Dave Braun
03:33:39
And we’re here to help you with our course and community and our White Glove Service, where we find a rockstar VA for you. And three things we’d love for you to do. And we’d really appreciate it. Number one, subscribe to the podcast if you haven’t already done so, either on your iPhone or Android phone or on YouTube. And number two, give us a rating, five stars, hopefully, but leave a comment below this video, talk about your role, even if you are in an organization and you aren’t the head of the organization. Talk about what your responsibilities are, how well you’ve been communicated with. So doing that, leaving us a comment, it really helps us get the word out. And then number three is go to Hiremyva.com for more information on our course and community, and our White Glove service. And of course you can grab a great free download.

Dave Braun
03:34:30
Currently, it’s the download where it gives you a very detailed checklist of how to Prepare for Hire and Thrive with a Virtual Assistant. So come join us in our course and community, even without experience, you’ll learn how to do this. Larry, you know, we’re helping a lot of folks. We just had a great Q&A call yesterday. And it went into some pretty good depths on some opportunities that folks have. And it was a blast. If you guys could at least listen to the replays, when you’re in our community, you would get a lot out of it. Because I know I do just being on the call and helping to facilitate that.

Larry Broughton
03:35:08
The Emails that we got afterwards from the folks that were on that were very sweet.

Dave Braun
03:35:12
Yeah. I love that one that we got, but you know, if you don’t remember any of this stuff, number one, just go to Hiremyva.com

Larry Broughton
03:35:23
Yeah. Hey folks, thanks so much. It’s so important that your team members know what the role is in the organization. But I think it’s even more important that we know it is our role in life. And for me, that’s like playing a significant role in the lives of our community and our family members, our places of worship, and our jobs. And it’s not just about you, but about your team members as well. Let’s help them recognize what significant roles they play as well. So I’ll just leave you with this. God bless you. God keep you. God hold you. All right, my friends, go do something significant today. Go, get them. Bye.

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