HireMyVA Podcast

HireMyVA Podcast 115- Why Are Habits Important?

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Episode Summary

In this episode, we’re going to talk about why habits are important.

A couple of great books, that we’ll link in the notes, are “The Power of Habit” by Charles Duhigg and “Atomic Habits” by James Clear.

These books have heavily influenced us to establish and work to break habits.

Resources
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Great podcast, Hidden Brain, talks about this: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/creatures-of-habit/id1028908750?i=1000546269429

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Looking for a business mentor that will surely propel you to success? Check out Larry's site.
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Learn more about Larry Broughton
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Learn more about Dave Braun
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Episode Transcription

Dave Braun
00:00:02
Hey, everybody! Welcome to the HireMyVA Team and Business Building Podcast brought to you by Yoogozi.com. And in this podcast and in HireMyVA, we help you to reclaim your freedom through hiring and thriving the virtual assistants without breaking the bank and that means your bank. I’m Dave Braun, and I’m here with Larry and we ought to get to it. How are we doing Larry?

Larry Broughton
00:00:23
If people could only see what happens before we start these recordings. It’s like watching sausage being made.

Dave Braun
00:00:33
No, no, no, no, no, no, no, but you know what? sausage being made, but yeah, sausage tastes good.

Larry Broughton
00:00:39
Exactly the outcome is awesome.

Dave Braun
00:00:42
We have it in our omelets all the time.

Larry Broughton

00:00:44

Well, hello, handsome, Dave, how are you? It’s great to see you last night with our little clan of warrior guys.

Dave Braun

00:00:50

Yeah, it was fun. It was awesome and that when Andrew came back home and was talking to him about the food that we fixed, that he fixed, and how we kind of combined a couple of recipes and it’s like, Andrew, you’re a star.

Larry Broughton

00:01:05

Well, I’ll tell you for those folks who have no idea what we’re talking about. Maybe this is your first time seeing or listening to one of our podcasts. Dave and I have been friends for 20 years at this point and we been through some battles, some ups and downs. And several years ago we started meeting with, with a group of guys. And then we kind of narrowed it down just over a year ago. Is that right?

Dave Braun

00:01:32

A year and a couple months. Yeah

Larry Broughton

00:01:33

Yeah. So Dave and, and I, and two of our very close friends, we get together every Wednesday night just to commune, have a meal together and to hold each other accountable on life. It’s a habit that we’ve built over the years. And it’s, you got a Dave It’s as if I’ve done this before, and it’s a habit that we’ve built where now we depend on it. If we miss a week, what you’ve only missed a couple over those past 14 months, but say we feel off, right? And so we depend on us like we’re, something’s missing from our lives. And so that kind of is a setup for what we’re gonna be talking about today, Dave. So why don’t you introduce our topic and we’re gonna be talking about with this episode in a few episodes moving forward.

Dave Braun

00:02:29

Yeah. In fact, this is first of a series and I think it will be four. But the question for this one episode, 115 is why are habits important? And so we’re talking about in one 16, the next one is how to establish and break habits. The next one after that is, we’ll talk about like the top habits that we think are important. And Charles Duhigg talks about that as Keystone habits. And then in episode 118, we’re going to talk about how to here. about were what of kind the that’s cause habits our outsource even

Larry Broughton

00:03:05

Dave, I’m gonna have you or ask you to kind of lead these next few. You’ve done a lot of study on this and you know, me, I’m, I take pride in differing. I feel like somebody knows more than I do cause I want to learn on the journey as well. Obviously I wouldn’t have reached any kind of success in my life had I not built habits? You know, whether it’s from wrestling in high school or martial arts career or my military career or my entrepreneurial career. Habits are part of life. But I know that there are a lot of people who struggled, Dave just in their day-to-day life and oftentimes when I’ve done tons of therapy as well, oftentimes because we haven’t developed those Keystone habits and we’re going to be talking about it at some point.

Larry Broughton

00:03:49

But so, I mean, there may be some people saying, well, what the heck are you guys even talking about? But you know, anyone who’s had gone through one life cycle, it’s going to tell you that habits are just essential to any kind of health, good health or success. I shouldn’t even say good health health in general, you may have some bad habits that can go your negative health, or you may the bad habits that lead to I hate to use the word failure in this context, because I think that failure is good if we approach it appropriately, but let’s say downward spiral, there can be bad habits that lead to a downward spiral in your life, but habits can break or make your chances of achieving and maintaining any kind of goals, Dave. You know, it’s like sticking to an exercise or diet plan or managing a medical condition.

Larry Broughton

00:04:47

But habits are really just a sequence or a series of events where you recognize a cue, you create a good response and you receive some sort of reward for it. Right? I can think about martial arts training or I can think about time and then the military. Whether the cue, somebody goes to throw a punch. And they work on it enough, there were flexibly. You learn how to block and then respond. And I remember the first time, not the first time I remember being in the military and learning tactical shooting. One of the things that gets pounded in your head in the beginning is that slow is smooth and smooth is fast. When you get the brain trained to actually just respond reflexively, it frees up a lot of brain work that you have to do. I think we’re probably going to talk about that a little bit more, but I just wanted to kind of lay that groundwork, Dave. Like what is a habit? Because again, I’m not, I’m not going to assume that everyone that’s on here is, you know, 43 years old and executive VP of an organization. We may have, like for instance, I know that my I’ve got a friend of my son who listened to these and he’s 17 years old. So let’s start with the basics there.

Dave Braun

00:06:09

Yeah. So I like it. So that’s a great definition. Habits are something that we do reflexively that we do unconsciously, that we don’t really have to think about because once we get that thinking in there that causes delays in time. And so there’s a bunch of reasons why, but Larry, I think one of the things that is important to give credit where credit’s due and we’ve got some of the stuff that I’ve learned, you’ve learned, there’s really a few fundamental books out there that I think are great. One of them I’m gonna show right here is called Atomic Habits. Well, you can see that. And if you’re watching this I’m or if you’re not watching this, I’m holding up the book, it’s called Atomic Habits by James Clear. That’s great one. And then this one here is called the power of oh I love this one so much The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg. And I’m holding that up as well.

Larry Broughton

00:07:06

In fact, that is in our reading list, our recommended reading list, it’s The Power of Habits. It’s powerful! Right? It’s great!

Dave Braun

00:07:13

Oh my gosh, it’s huge!

Larry Broughton

00:07:16

A lot of the stuff we’re gonna be talking about today comes from that book.

Dave Braun

00:07:21

Yeah. And then there’s, there’s some podcasts out there. There’s one of the ones that I love to hear it’s I listened to, it’s called hidden brain by NPR. And now some of you folks might listen to this and think about NPR. Sometimes NPR can get a little bit political, but this particular podcast, it’s very rare when they do that. So get out of your brain, the fact that it’s NPR, but it’s done really, really well. They interview a lot of great people, tell stories and it’s done really professionally. Yeah. So I recommend that particular podcast. So anyway, let’s talk about why the habits are important. We’re going to go through some of these really, really quickly, and it may surprise you and that how important these are. And the other thing is that it’s vital for you guys to understand that habits are so important to, to how we do things and achieve things like you said, Larry.

Dave Braun

00:08:18

And so it’s worth understanding. It’s worth spending the time devising, developing and breaking habits in order to support and help you create the life that you want. Yeah. So here’s a couple of things about it. All right. So one of the podcasts, the one I referred to there in Hidden Brain, one of the episodes, and we’ll link that in the show notes, they talked about 43% of our daily actions are habitual 43%. Almost half of our actions are habitual. We rely on habits to execute so many things. So it only makes sense for us to be controlling those, to designing those and creating those. You know, you think about the habits that we have on this podcast. And I have pretty much the same opening every single time. Well, there’s a reason for that consistency, but a reason for that is that our brains are built for habits. Okay. Our brains are built because one of the things that happens is when we are executing unconsciously or how have our habits, our brains aren’t working as much.

Larry Broughton

00:09:27

Can I put it a different way, Dave? our brain is constantly searching for patterns. Yes. Okay. And so often if we came on to every time, and we did different opening to the podcast, people will ask what am I listening to here? Yeah. Right. So it’s constantly seeking, searching for patterns.

Dave Braun

00:09:47

The familiar.

Larry Broughton

00:09:48

The familiar. Yes.

Dave Braun

00:09:49

And in fact, one of the things that I wanted to show about this and, and why we’re searching for the familiar is because we can make decisions quicker. And really our brains take, even though it’s like Larry, I think I can’t exactly remember, like it’s only a 10% of our body mass, but they take up, I don’t know, 50% of our energy or whatever our brain, it just uses a tremendous amount of energy. And as you know, as we have evolved over, you know, a whole bunch of years, we haven’t had food supply as ample as it has been. So our bodies are designed to conserve energy. We store fat when we may not want to. Right. And so our brains will want to save energy as well. And by looking for patterns and cues, and then getting into these habits, our brains, you know, kind of turn down, in fact, here’s you guys see on this podcast, I’ll, if you’re watching the video, you’ll see it, but this is great-

Dave Braun

01:10:54

Straight from the book. So the top figure is they took some, some, what do they electrodes and put them in a, in a rat’s brain, as it was going through a maze. And the top picture shows all this brain activity it’s really spiking up. And this is as they first learn it well, about a week later at the bottom, there’s a lot of activity at the beginning when they’re searching for that pattern, that cue find that cue. Then when they’re executing the routine, the brain energy and activity goes way, way down. Okay. And then at the end, when we get the reward, that’s when the brain energy goes back up. Cause we want that reward.

Larry Broughton

01:11:33

Think about when you’re driving a car, most people who are listening to this have driven a car before, and maybe you do drive a car. I can think of times where I’ve left my house because I’m such a creature of habit. I know where my car is parked and I know what I need to do. There’ll be times I’ll be driving down the street and I’ll reflect back for a second. I don’t even remember. I got an electric car. I don’t even remember unplugging the car. I don’t remember getting in the car. I don’t remember none of my driveway cause it’s so habitual, same thing over and over and over again. Right. And that’s because the brain is just on autopilot.

Dave Braun

01:12:10

Yeah. And, and because it’s built that way. So that’s one thing that’s so important to recognize is that we are on autopilot according to some of the statistics, 43% of the time. Including driving a car, I mean, there’s so many other things. And you know, the other aspect of it is that, you know, because our brains use so much energy and we really have only so much like willpower decision-making capability, it makes sense for us to conserve it when we can. An example would be as a lot of you, you know, especially myself as I’ve got great brain energy and decision-making capability at the beginning of the day. But at the end of the day, depending upon what’s gone on it’s like I I’m burnt, I’m dust. I can’t hardly think about certain things and I’ve got to recover. So it makes sense to build as many things habitually as you can, to save that energy. So you can have that decision-making, you know, be able to do that as much as possible. Larry, in fact, I know some folks, they will wear the same thing every day. They will eat the same thing for every meal. I’m like, I eat the same smoothie for breakfast every morning. And I’m thinking about other things as I’m doing it. Yeah. So it makes sense to do that. Yeah.

Larry Broughton

01:13:36

This is why when you’re learning something new Dave, or if you’re in a time of crisis where your brain is dealing with, things of it’s never dealt with before, you may have not even moved from a chair all day, but you feel physically and emotionally exhausted at the end of the day, because you’re dealing with new things that your brain has never dealt with before. And so you’re right from a physiological perspective, this is why the brain wants to find patterns. So this is not expending as much energy. And so this is really great. If you’re trying to build a new habit, you’re trying to make, you know, reach a new physical goal in your life, develop a new professional level of success. This is why habits are so darn important.

Dave Braun

01:14:16

Yeah. Yeah. And you know, one, another real big reason why they’re important is they will help us do things that we don’t want to do. But we know we need to do three new designs that way, you know, for an exam, for example, exercise, and we’ll talk all along. That’s one of, one of the key things, Keystone habits. We’ll talk about that and how to help yourself. But a little hint there is, you know, if you do little things like laying your exercise, clothes out the night before, then you get up and you don’t even have to think, you just, this is the way I do it. I get up. I don’t think I just go to the bathroom, put these clothes on. But if I have to start making decisions about what I’m going to do, where I’m going to go, what I’m going to wear, what I’m going to drink, all that stuff, then it’s, those are barriers. And, and I don’t want to use my brain energy for that. I want to have these, these little things cue me into that habit of getting off my button and exercising. That’s right.

Dave Braun

01:15:17

Yeah. So one of the other reasons that’s important is, you know, we are like, we talked about we’re built for habits, and if we’re going to have the habits, we need them to have habits that are actually driving us, fueling us, helping us get what we want, because if we don’t establish those habits, then there’s going to be habits that are just going to happen anyway. We might as well take control of them because you can have a habit every morning of eating a donut and a cup of coffee for your breakfast. Or you can have a healthy breakfast smoothie every morning, you can do it either way. Both can be a habit and it’s important then that you just take control of them. So we naturally do habits anyway, because our brains want to save energy, that’s the way we are. So we might as well take control of them and understand that.

Larry Broughton

01:16:13

Yeah, that’s good. really

Dave Braun

01:16:16

The other thing too, is from a business perspective, this is really, really important, Larry. And I think people don’t realize it. We always talk about, we think about habits. I mean, exercises, one of the habits that we, you know, that, that people use as an example, but our organizations have habits. The cultures that we have in our families, the organizations that we’re leading, our companies have organizational habits as well. And it’s just like the way we are. If we don’t establish those, if we don’t take control of those, then somebody else is going to, and it may not be what you want.

Larry Broughton

01:16:51

That’s a really great point about the business side, you know, you and I, both we own businesses, we consult with businesses, we coach and train folks on businesses, like the financial success of your organization. I know that we’ve had a lot of business owners who listened to this podcast, but sadly, one of the most difficult things to get people to do when they’re in a small business is to regularly prepare financial statements. You and I were just talking about this the other day, if like you do it one month, and then you skip it for a few months, you try to do another one. It’s always a pain in the rear. And it seems like it takes so much energy and you get frustrated. But if like in our hotel company where we are like militant, we do it every day. We do many financials.

Larry Broughton

01:17:36

Like what happened the night before, right? And then we string those together to create monthly financial reports, it becomes very easy because it’s a habitual part of our organization. And so I can talk to Anna and say, Hey, can I see the financials for this month? Let’s say it’s the fifth and the month. Boom, they’re there. Yeah. If you’ve never done that before you’re scrambling. And it takes a lot more brain energy and emotional energy to get the darn thing done. So I know that we keep using the exercise one, but I want, and it’s important, but because it is one of those Keystone habits, for sure. And we’re talking about this a little bit more later on, but don’t forget that, like you said, David’s so important to build organizational habits as well as a leader, It should be a habit for you.

Larry Broughton

01:18:22

When you walk in the door. If you have a team members, it should be a habit of walking, the four corners, touching base with your team members. I had a conversation with one of our general managers recently, it should be a habit for this person that before they even walk in the door, they walk the perimeter of the building. Because as soon as you walk in and you put your suitcase or your suitcase, your briefcase in your office, you’re going to get stuck there. So it should be habitual to do things before you start the day and,

Dave Braun

01:18:50

And your habits and the thing that you’re taught, these things that you’re talking about, Larry, they sound like a lot of work. Well they kind of are initially.

Larry Broughton

01:18:59

Yes. Initially,

Dave Braun

01:18:59

Initially, but once they are established and you do it the right way, it becomes like clockwork, it becomes and the other thing about why habits are so important is if we’re using our unconscious part of our brain, then we are executing way, way, way faster. I think it is in the Power of Habit. I think it is where he talk about what Tony Dungy did as a coach in his super bowl winning year for the Indianapolis Colts, as he established habits in people’s brains, he, he taught them to look for like the defensive lineman and, and they taught them to look for little cues on how the offensive line was going to shift his arm or his shoulder or something like that and then they would react, just react. They wouldn’t even think. And so it allowed them to be very, very, very, very, very fast on the field.

Dave Braun

01:19:50

Yeah. So we think that setting up the financial stuff like you talked about, yeah. It’s a lot of work upfront, but doing it on a regular basis, it isn’t, it isn’t as bad. It really isn’t as bad as you think. Yeah. Yeah. And as far as organizational habits, a great example is what Tony Dungy did with the Indianapolis Colts. And they’ve, you know, they broke through and finally won a superbowl with Peyton Manning. And one of the things that they did, that was awesome- He worked with the team to start looking at cues, so they would recognize a cue. And then they would go into a routine of looking at, say an offensive lineman, if they’re a defensive lineman, looking at an offensive lineman’s body, how we moved, et cetera, et cetera. So that they were able then to react. As you mentioned, Larry, they were able to react much faster and quicker.

Dave Braun

02:20:44

And that’s what happens when we get these habits going unconsciously, we just execute and we can execute a lot faster. You know, I know, I remember this habit of what drove me nuts in my former company I that was in semiconductor company, drove me nuts as people were late to meetings. Oh geez. Oh my gosh. It would be, I always like to get there on time and I use the time to connect with people. It was okay, but you never know what started five minutes, late, 10 minutes late. And it really was driven from the top down. So it became a habit. And then pretty soon people aren’t even showing up, you know, on time, everybody gets there five minutes later, 10 minutes late, nobody thinks it’s a big deal. So habits happen in our organizations pretty easily, pretty easily.

Larry Broughton

02:21:31

It’s so interesting to you to say that, you know, I don’t sleep sometimes and try to put myself to sleep. I do what I tell others not to do. And then I’ll have the TV on right. To kind of talk me to sleep. I know you can keep your emails. You don’t need to be sending texts. I know I should not have any screen time for an hour. So do, as I say, not as I do, but anyway, last night there was the TV show bar rescue. You guys have r ever seen this. But John Tapper was dealing with hotel and food or hotel. It was actually a bar at a hotel in Florida. And there was a cultural habit of people, not even employees, not even looking or caring about what the schedule was. It would have habitually come in 15 minutes late or an hour late one girl, one day when they were there came in four hours late. Right? Because there was there was not the culture of making sure that people were there on time. So what happens in that kind of an organization, if there’s this lack of lackadaisical, kind of a culture of not showing up to meetings on time, maybe coming in for your shift, maybe not. And just things throughout the entire organization become lax, right? There’s no accountability. Somebody’s habits are about personal accountability.

Dave Braun

02:22:55

Yeah. And in fact, one of the things that successful organizations and successful people do is they set up their environments for their success. So like one of the things that you can do, this is kind of a hint. Maybe it goes in another episode, but one things that you can do is set your environment up to help you avoid temptation, avoid the QT, even start, we’ll talk about that probably in the next one. But you know, I, I, one of the things that I realized Larry is my mom was staying with us over the holidays and, and we have candy out for decorations around the holidays. You know, we buy the Christmas decorated candy and, or whatever, and she would be walking by with her Walker and look over at this candy dish and then take a couple pieces of candy and then she’d go and keep going. And it’s like, well, she wouldn’t do that. If the candy wasn’t sitting there.

Larry Broughton

02:23:49

Well, I admit that I got suckered into it last night, after dinner at your house was sitting right in front of me,

Dave Braun

02:23:55

Sitting there in that beautiful packaging. So that’s I, and that’s, so that’s one of the things that we want to emphasis with is set your environment up for success both helping to you to encourage, to do things that you want and to discouraged things that you don’t want -that’s a quick example. So that’s, that’s really a good summary. I think of why habits are important. I mean, so much of your success and failure is going to be attributed to habits when basically half of your decision-making that you’re doing throughout the day is because of your habits.

Larry Broughton

02:24:32

Yeah. Dave, you’ve talked about this before. You’re really good at explaining this. There was Noah St. John or, you know, we talked about how things are processed faster. Yeah. And we moved from the unconscious to the conscious. Do you want to explain that process to people? I think that might be, might be beneficial everybody. for

Dave Braun

02:24:55

Yeah. I’d be happy to.

Larry Broughton

02:24:57

You’ve done a great job by the way, Dave and I, for the, again, for those folks who don’t know, we run masterminds where entrepreneurs, leaders, and high achievers get together. And so David you’ve explained it really well, a couple of times to our mastermind members.

Dave Braun

02:25:12

Yeah. So think about, as I talk about this, think about Larry, what you brought up before was driving a car, right. Learning how to drive a car. So we really start when, when we’re learning things and building habits, we really come to the start off at unconscious incompetence,

Larry Broughton

02:25:28

Get your brain around that unconscious incompetence.

Dave Braun

02:25:32

So it’s basically, we don’t know what we, what we don’t know. So think about driving a car. When I was, I remember when I was 12 or 13 telling my dad, you need to drive like this you’re driving bad, blah, blah, blah, blah. Oh, well, that looks so easy to me. Right. Because I didn’t know what it didn’t know.

Dave Braun

02:25:51

Right. And then, and then it goes to more like where you’re consciously incompetent. You’re like, oh my gosh. You know, when you’re starting to drive yourself yourself, you get in there. It’s like, oh my gosh, this is a lot harder to harder than I thought. I don’t what are the, what are the steps? I, I like, do I put my seatbelt on first? When do I put the key in? or got out of the radio radio on? You know? So you’re, you’re constantly thinking, oh my gosh, this is really a lot harder than I thought. And you don’t understand that. Or you start understanding that you don’t know

Larry Broughton

02:26:26

What I’m saying. There’s a lot of moving parts.

Dave Braun

02:26:28

Yeah. There’s a lot of moving parts and what’s really important to know what about this stage that learning something is it’s very uncomfortable for sure. And we want to like, say, screw this driving or screw learning the accounting that we want to do, or screw setting up our financial statements. Like we said, because it’s just too much trouble. It’s too hard.

Larry Broughton

02:26:52

And this is the point where people oftentimes quit. They quit, frankly, before they even get across the starting line. Okay. And there’s a psychological term called it’s very descriptive “the hell with it”. Like literally that’s what they say “the hell with it” syndrome. So, but that’s it right? Cause this is more difficult than I thought it was going to be. And so why even try.

Dave Braun

02:27:19

Yeah. Yeah. And there’s, there’s ways that we’ve learned to get around that. And what maybe we’ll talk about in another podcast episode or anyway. So, so you start off at unconscious incompetence. You don’t know what you don’t know. Then you go to conscious incompetence where, you know what you don’t know. Then the next level is conscious competence where you start knowing things and you know how to do it, but you have to think it through. So like driving a car, especially if you, hopefully there’s not too many people, probably that know how to do a stick anymore. Right. Drive a manual transmission.

Larry Broughton

02:27:58

My son, who is 17 intentionally wanting to get a manual transmission car. And so we did. And it was very interesting because as we’re talking about it, I could see him talking himself through, okay, I’m approaching the hill. I need to start doing this. I’m starting to come up to a stop sign. You can see the wheels spinning. He’s consciously building those neuro pathways in his brain to become more competent. Exactly.

Dave Braun

02:28:25

Exactly.

Larry Broughton

02:28:25

Yeah. And as he did it, the more and more, and the more he did it, the real, those neural pathways started getting a groove in them that led to the next phase, which is

Dave Braun

02:28:36

Unconscious competence. Right? Yeah. So, so this is a great example of how powerful our brains are. Because if you just take that little example of driving a manual transmission, getting in a car. Larry you talked about, you get in a car and you go. And so all of a sudden you’re there somewhere. So what happens is, you know, think about all the steps to do a manual, drive a manual transmission car. You open the door, you get in, you gotta put your seat belt on. Then you wanna make sure you what you gotta step on the brake, put the clutch in, turn the key, make sure you’re in neutral. And then you’re different if you’re on a pill or not right with the emergency brake. And it’s like, you can’t leave out the radio, got to turn the radio on the favorite tune.

Dave Braun

02:29:24

All right. And then it’s like, okay, I still have my clutch in. Now I’m going to shift into first gear. Well, first gear is, let me look at the pattern on the little knob is first of the top left or where is that? So at the top left, and then you got to start gradually lifting the, bringing the clutch out and getting, putting the gas on. But then you’ve got to check your mirrors while you’re doing that, watch a speedometer and then look at people, you know, around you. If you’re backing up, look behind you, then that lock. So it’s a lot of stuff, right? And so our brains are so powerful that pretty soon we don’t have to think about it once when we go, like what you said, Larry to unconscious competence. We hardly even have to think about it. We just do it. And we do it like that. It’s so fast.

Larry Broughton

03:30:10

And it’s interesting if you just push through this conscious incompetent phase, the, to hell with it syndrome, your brain very quickly moves into this conscious unconscious competence phase. And in fact, during one of the masterminds day, do you remember we showed this movie of the study or not a movie, a little video clip of a study that was done. I think it was done in the UK where they did their reverse upside down glasses, right. Where they had people wear these glasses that flipped everything upside down and they measured. How long did it take for the brain to get accustomed to that- Everything from riding a bicycle to writing their name. And it happened pretty quickly once they got through the uncomfortable phase. Right. And it switched back even quicker when they took them off.

Dave Braun

03:31:00

So that’s a, that’s a key point about habits and why habits are important. And you’ve got to take control of them because if you say you’re trying to break a habit and maybe replacing with something else, if you’re not careful, you can go back very quickly to correct. That’s right. Right. And that’s a great example of that, Larry. Yeah. So that’s why habits are important. Hope you guys enjoyed that. Wait till our next episodes, man, we’re going to give you so much good information stuff that’s helped us in our lives and we’re still learning and we’re still growing. Even our, even at our advanced age.

Larry Broughton

03:31:39

Hey, I resemble that.

Dave Braun

03:31:42

All right. Larry, any final thoughts before we end this?

Larry Broughton

03:31:44

Yeah, I would just say push through. I’m going to put an emphasis on this push through the conscious incompetence phase. That’s where all the discomfort comes and much of the discomfort comes in our lives and imagine had you just not switched into the, to hell with it phase, but you pushed through the discomfort. How different would your life be? Well, we happen to be recording this in early January, 2022. And it’s a good time just to start, start thinking about is now the time to be developing some new habits. You know, some people may in particular, calling 2021, the great reset. What are we resetting for for 2022? Right? You’ve had plenty of time to think about what happened in 2021. All right. Let’s push through the discomfort just through the next few weeks, and you’re going to see great change in your life. If you don’t, how’s that working out for you, if you’re accepting the bad habits in your life right now, how’s that working out for you? you know for a lot of us shame builds up around that. And it’s one of those really low vibrational emotions that we don’t need.

Dave Braun

03:32:48

Well we’re going to talk about some of those habits that you guys can develop and work on. And of course it’s important to be part of our course and community where we can help each other. We can talk about our morning routines. We can talk about in the Q and A’s, it’s like, you can ask, how do I establish this habit over here? I’m always doing this or that. You know, so a lot of times you need other people around you, especially when you’re taught trying to do that. And our course and community will help you do that. And of course, we’re all about getting virtual assistants and having them help us get freedom in our lives. So we’ve also got a White Glove Service where we can find a rockstar VA for you, or you can come into our course and learn how to get a VA that can actually help you offload some of these establishing some of these habits and actually help you be, even be accountable.

Dave Braun

03:33:44

And we’ll talk about that in a future episode, but we’ve got a couple of things that we want you to do right now. And we’d really appreciate it. Number one, subscribe to this podcast, if you haven’t already done. So, and then on YouTube, do it there as well. Hit the subscribe button and click on the little bell next to it. Hopefully get some reminders. And then number two, give us a rating wherever you’re at. Preferably a five star. Leave us a comment somewhere below the video. Any comment, because it helps us to get the word out on what we’re doing because we really just love helping folks. And then the third thing is go to Hiremyva.com. You can get more information on our course and community. Some of our free downloads that we got there, which are growing and growing, and we’ve got great plans for this quarter. So go to Hiremyva.com and remember though, even without experience, you’ll learn how to prepare for hire and thrive with virtual assistants. We want to help you. We’re helping a bunch of folks and just come on in and join us. Dip your toe in the water. Had some fun with this.

Larry Broughton

03:34:42

I prefer you to jump in full force. Don’t dip your toe in the water. But do yourself a favor and do the world a favor. Go do something significant today. All right, God bless you. God keep you, God hold you. Alright my friends. Go get them. We’ll see you next time.

Dave Braun

03:34:59

Bye everybody!

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